Update: Everyone is a winner.

IMG_6072After cleaning his room, I found this pile of medals outside my 12 year old’s room.

“What are these doing here?” I asked him.

“I don’t want them anymore,” he replied.

“You don’t want any of these? Why not?”

“There’s too many…”

This is exactly what I was talking about in this post. By awarding him a medal for “participating,” the medals mean nothing. Some of these medals are for winning, but because he got a medal whether he won or not, those medals are discarded just like the others.

Medals, ribbons and trophies meant something when I was a kid. It meant you performed better than the other kids. It meant you tried your best and was the best. It doesn’t matter if it’s the class spelling bee or a state-wide competition. The point is you worked hard, studied, trained, whatever…to earn that ribbon or medal. Only the select few were awarded them. And you were proud.

Fast forward to 2015: Kids don’t care about those awards because they’ve been taught that just by “participating” or “showing up,” they are deserving of something.

I’m not the only one with the “only winners get medals” mentality. A recent poll said 57 percent of Americans think only winners should be rewarded. But here’s where it gets interesting.  When respondents were broken down by age, younger respondents (those 18-24) liked the idea of participation trophies, while the older generations thought the opposite. Is it because that’s how the younger generation grew up?  Because that’s what we have taught them?

As I mentioned in my previous post, in the real world a reward for “showing up” or “doing your job” doesn’t exist. Why do we act like it does?

Journalists Need More than a Press Release From PR Pros

journalists need more than a press release
This was originally posted on CUinsight.com

Your credit union has lots of great stories to tell. Getting those stories in the hands of journalists and influencers can be challenging.

You may think journalists have email overload, just like everyone else. You are right, but consider this: according to a recent survey by PWR New Media, 88% of journalists say they want to hear from you via email.

But here’s the caveat: they want more.

Journalists and bloggers need easy to read, concise information, accompanied by shareable visuals, with access to background information and other graphics.

What does this mean?

It means in addition to your written press release, you should include one or more of the following:

  • high resolution photos or downloadable images
  • shareable infographic
  • tweetable pull quotes/appropriate Facebook post
  • in-depth data or statistics that support your information
  • links to background or supporting information
  • b-roll or other appropriate video
  • relevant audio sound bites

Not convinced? Of the journalists surveyed, 77% said they would be more likely to cover a story if it included access to appropriate images.

Here’s more:

  • 85% want relevant backgrounders, bios and supporting information
  • 78% want verbiage from news release
  • 46% want a link to relevant blog on topic
  • 41% want information about brand’s social media platforms so they can follow or view

While newsrooms are shrinking, reporters are expected to do more. Newspaper journalists write articles and produce short videos to post online. Reporters at radio stations must also include a print version of their story, complete with graphics. Television journalists are expected to write online content to post on websites, in addition to their traditional broadcast segment. Hunting down a headshot, video or background information isn’t something journalists have time to do.

Your job as a communications professional is to make the media’s job as easy as possible. By providing a variety of elements with your press release, you are more likely to receive coverage and tell your credit union’s story.

NORAD Santa Tracker: It all started with a little typo…

NORAD Santa Tracker
The North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) has been tracking Santa since 1955…and it all started with a little typo.

The story goes that an advertisement for Sears Roebuck & Co. listed a phone number for children to call Santa.

Sears Roebuck & Co Santa ad

No one bothered to proofread the ad, and it was published with the phone number to NORAD, then called CONAD (Continental Air Defense Command). That’s why it’s important to proofread. And yes, that includes calling phone numbers.

Rather than be annoyed that CONAD would have to field calls from children wanting to talk to Santa, the Director of Operations at the time, Colonel Harry Shoup, embraced the issue and had his staff check the radar for indications of Santa making his way around the world. Children who called were given updates on his location.

The tradition still lives today as hundreds of volunteers man phones and continue to update children who call. There’s also an online tracker as well, as Santa makes his way around the world.

Shoup did what any great PR pro would do: took what could be an unfortunate situation and turn it into a positive public relations story. Sure, it took more staff hours and probably put them behind on their “real” work, but the ability to make Christmas magical for children, and the community spirit that came out of it was worth it.

The moral of the story? Proofreading matters. Unless you want to end up tracking Santa every Christmas.